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Thursday, 31 May 2012

RHINO HORN IS OFF THE MENU FOREVER!

Rhino Horn off the Menu - Forever!                                   
FOLLOW UP LETTER to TREVOR SALMON, CITES RHINO WORKING GROUP
Dear Mr. Salmon,

PROPOSAL WITH REGARD TO CERATOTHERIUM SIMUM SIMUM

Further to our previous communications I would like to provide you with feedback on a petition that will be handed over to the Secretary-General of CITES in Geneva within the next few days. We are proud to announce that 11,469 signatures were collected in response to an appeal to CITES to organise an emergency meeting with a single agenda point: Put all possible measures in place to stop the out-of control poaching of rhinos.
http://www.causes.com/causes/658114-speak-for-me-please-my-horn-is-not-medicine/actions/1644204
I have carefully considered your reply of the 30th April 2012 and the advice therein.
FIRSTLY, when I first wrote to you on the 14th April 2012, I was under the impression that the species Southern White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum simum) is included under Appendix II of the CITES Appendices.
I have subsequently found out that at Cop9 in 1994 the proposal from SOUTH AFRICA was accepted with restrictions as per annotation 503:
Ceratotherium simum simum *(population of South Africa, for the trade in live animals to appropriate and acceptable destinations and hunting trophies only)
[An asterisk (*) placed against the name of a subspecies, species or higher taxon indicates that one or more geographically separate populations, subspecies or species of that subspecies, species or taxon are included in Appendix I and are excluded from Appendix II.]
At CoP10 a further proposal was made, again ONLY by South Africa to amend annotation 503: “to allow the trade in parts and derivatives, but with a zero export quota, of Ceratotherium simum simum [South Africa]” This proposal was defeated on two occasions, with a stronger defeat in the secret ballot and those opposing the proposal emphasized that adequate trade controls were not in place and that the proposed annotation might undermine efforts to reduce rhinoceros horn consumption in consumer countries.
Switzerland then proposed another annotation which was accepted: “All other specimens shall be deemed to be specimens of species included in Appendix I and the trade in them shall be regulated accordingly.” In light of this, it is clear that the specimens outside of South Africa and Swaziland are still deemed to be on Appendix I.
THEREFORE I DRAW THE CONCLUSION THAT THE SOUTHERN WHITE RHINOS SENT TO CHINA ARE NOW INCLUDED IN THE POPULATION OF CHINA AND FALL UNDER APPENDIX I AND ENJOY THE PROTECTION AFFORDED THAT CLASSIFICATION .
I previously assumed that Ceratotherium simum simum had been down listed to Appendix II whereas ONLY THE POPULATIONS OF SOUTH AFRICA and SWAZILAND had. An easy mistake to make, seeing as most of the world population of this species is to be found in those 2 countries. I apologise for that confusion.
This is why I requested that the Southern White rhino be moved “back” to Appendix I – whereas in fact it is already there with two exceptions:
SOUTH AFRICA and SWAZILAND (with restrictions that are not easily enforced).
SECONDLY, I wish to discuss reasons why another proposal must be made at CoP16 in March 2013.
PROPOSAL A:
THAT ANNOTATION 503 BE REVISED AS FOLLOWS:
· THAT TRADE IN LIVE ANIMALS BE SUSPENDED:
1. UNTIL POACHING LEVELS ARE BROUGHT BACK TO PRE-1994 LEVELS FOR SOUTH AFRICA AND SWAZILAND
2. UNTIL SOUTH AFRICA AND SWAZILAND ARE FULLY COMPLIANT TO LEGISLATION AND REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO PROTECTION OF THE SPECIES.
· THAT THE HUNTING OF CERATOTHERIUM SIMUM SIMUM BE SUBJECT TO CERTIFICATION BY THE SCIENTIFIC AUTHORITY OF THE IMPORTING COUNTRY THAT THE IMPORT IS NOT DETRIMENTAL TO THE SURVIVAL OF THE SPECIES AND WILL NOT BE USED FOR COMMERCIAL PURPOSES.
PROPOSAL B:
THAT ALL PARTIES COLLECT ALL AND ANY RHINO HORN STOCKPILES IN THEIR COUNTRIES AND BURN THEM TO DESTRUCTION.
Taking the following into consideration:
1. When South Africa first proposed the downlisting of Ceratotherium simum simum they failed to inform the Secretariat of the political agenda in the country, i.e. since 1989 they were in secret meetings with the ANC party to facilitate the handing over of the governance of the country which has had huge implications for the National Parks Boards and wildlife as will be explained later.
2. Part of the agenda was to sell off high value wild animals such as rhino so that private individuals (mostly farmers) could for the first time obtain these and conduct the business of wildlife farming – a relatively new industry. “During 1965 there were four fenced game ranches in former north-western Transvaal. Forty years later there are 5061 registered.” (du Toit) Similarly the Commercial hunting industry experienced rapid growth. “The Wildlife industry in South Africa… has proven to be very difficult to regulate.” (du Toit)
3. In their proposal at CoP9, South Africa set out the reasons why the status of the Southern White Rhino should be downlisted. They declared a healthy and growing population under effective management and living in the perfect habitat. They claimed that the rhinos could withstand the exploitation that trade would bring and that trade would not lead to reduction in controls in other species. None of these claims are valid today, 20 years on. In fact, since the sale of rhino to private owners the authorities and scientists have lost all control over the recording of population figures, except to say that the numbers don’t add up and this proves that horn is moving illegally from farmers to the Far East. (e.g. the Groenewald Gang arrested in 2010)
4. With regard to illegal trade, in 1994 they noted that legislation on penalties for poaching had been made stricter and the anti-poaching efforts allowed both black & white rhino populations to flourish (although just north of the border a different scenario played out in Zimbabwe where 65,000 black rhino had fallen to 2,500.) It is difficult to understand why this warning bell was ignored.
5. The proposers felt confident enough to promote privatization schemes and trophy hunting, even claiming that trade “will not result in an increased level of undesirable or illegal exploitation of the southern white rhinoceros, in fact the reverse is expected.” This has also proved to be wrong. Rhino species populations are decreasing and even going extinct due to unprecedented increases in poaching. e.g. the Western Black Rhino.
6. They were so bold as to discuss “Potential Controlled Utilization” such as darting safaris; the sale of horn, toenails and skin; slaughter for products (!) and ranching for horn. In 1994 rhino horn was used for Yemenite dagger making and TCM medicine. The proposers of this industry were surely aware then that rhino horn has no valid medicinal value. This has now been scientifically proven. A rumour of a cancer cure that was spread in Vietnam goes unfounded and exists only to open up new markets. As I have mentioned before – this is tantamount to fraud.
The majority of these products would be derived from natural mortalities OR live animals (using inhumane capture methods, darting with M-99, a practice rejected by animal welfare NGO’s)
7. Mention is made of supporting underprivileged communities in the vicinity of the parks. This has never been realized in any recognizable form. Usually the local communities are fobbed off with a rhino that they can sell for hunting or free handouts.
8. The same can be said for calls to educate the citizens of South Africa and the Far East, who are the traditional buyers of rhino horn. Lip service has been paid to this aspect, leading to further delays while species go extinct.
9. In their summary, the proposers were emphatic in their belief that the population of southern white rhinos was not endangered, but they conceded that it was certainly threatened. Despite having discussed the benefits of trade at length, they denied any wish to trade rhinoceros horn in any shape or form, although they wanted to trade the hides. AT THE VERY NEXT CoP THEY PROPOSED TRADE IN HORN! [CoP10 in 1997 proposed an annotation ° 503 to allow the trade in parts and derivatives but with a zero export quota (South Africa). It was rejected. ]
10. AT CoP9 The Secretariat REJECTED SOUTH AFRICA’S PROPOSAL AS IT STOOD AND RECOMMENDED : It should be accepted if the population in Appendix II is annotated as follows: "For the exclusive purpose of allowing trade in live animals.
All other specimens shall be deemed to be specimens of species included in Appendix I and trade in them shall be regulated accordingly."("accordingly" could be replaced by "in accordance with the provisions of Article III or VII of the Convention".). Doc. 9.47 Annex 3.
The original intention for allowing trade was described such by the Secretariat:
“exports are generally to zoos, safari parks and private land−owners setting up breeding groups. There are many potential importers who would use animals for exhibition, whose purpose of import would be clearly commercial. However, they would be able to import animals only if the species were transferred to Appendix II.
This intention has been abused. “South Africa: Rhinos and Lions Sold to ‘Hell Hole’ Zoo in BangladeshRhinos, lions, and other imperiled wildlife are being exported from South Africa to a Bangladeshi zoo with a dark and suspicious history.After purchasing at least 19 wild animals from a “safari park” in South Africa, government-run Dhaka Zoo apparently received its first shipment last week – pairs of white rhinos, white lions, striped hyenas, and a spotted hyena.” (New Age)
A proposal from the China Institute of Science and Technology Research, Beijing, entitled Proposal for Protection of the Rhinoceros and the Sustainable Use of Rhinoceros Horn – funded by the State Soft Sciences Project, Development for Traditional Chinese Medicine Research – contains troubling information indicating that China is already farming rhinos in order to use rhino horn in traditional Chinese medicine. (Source: http://www.rhinoconservation.org (http://s.tt/1aul1)
THIRDLY, I would like to point out how the statements made in the 1994 proposal are misleading.
1. Since 1994, when the Government of South Africa changed hands peacefully, there have been great changes in style of leadership. For example, the CEO of SANParks, the organization that controls the Kruger National Park made the following statements recently: “It will be an unforgivable mistake if we were to accept the sickening tendency by a handful of ‘old-school’ conservationists appointing themselves as agents of positive societal change…. We therefore agree with our Minister when she refers to national parks as “hubs of economic development in our society”. This shows a lack of respect for both conservation and wilderness areas AND GOES AGAINST GLOBAL NORMS OF CONSERVATION IDEALS.
2. After being granted the right to trade rhinos from CITES, the National Parks Boards began a program of selling high value wildlife e.g. rhinoceros to wildlife farmer/ranchers. This led to serious abuse of the animals and I have discussed this in previous e-mails. It has been expressed by many experts that the illegal trade in wildlife is escalating, and happening at a scale that poses immediate risk to many animals and indeed people too because it is conducted with international crime syndicates, and aligned to other types of crime (e.g. horn for weapons).
3. Many organisations, including the Minister of Environmental Affairs in SA have described the current poaching crisis as uncontrollable. This was admitted by the officer in charge of anti-poaching in the Kruger National Park earlier this year. Despite this, security remains lax at most of the private and government owned rhino facilities, and no effort is made to step it up using readily available surveillance systems. Game wardens have been arrested for poaching, as well as ex-policemen, which shows the involvement of the very authorities appointed to protect them.
4. As many as 75% of the rhino farmer / ranchers are non-compliant with the registering and micro-chipping of their animals and horn stockpiles. (du Toit) TRAFFIC has been reporting on these irregularities for years.
5. Promises made by the authorities have not been kept. Earlier this year the Minister of Environment promised to re-erect the fence between the Kruger National Park and Mozambique. Unfortunately most of the opportunistic type of poaching is conducted by Mozambique nationals, as has been proven from arrests. Crucial to the protection of rhino in South Africa is a secure Kruger National Park as this is where the majority live.
6. Despite the fact that South Africa has had success in the past with a healthy rhinoceros population, we cannot sustain such a level of off take as we have seen these past 3 years.
CONCLUSION:
Ever since CITES was first established the question of trade in rhinoceros horn has been raised over and over again and the issue of poaching remains a problem. Certain parties in South Africa, including Government parastatals insist on keeping the hope of trading horn alive. The International Community is not in agreement and attempts to compromise, for example by agreeing to the South African proposal in 1994, have only worsened the situation. Firm action must be taken immediately if the Southern White Rhino is to be spared the fate of other species, 2 of which went extinct in 2011 – one in a range and one in totality. The escalation of poaching and criminal activity is also driven by new found wealth & status in the Far East. This is going to increase, not lessen.
The last few thousand remaining rhinos on earth must receive the highest form of protection NOT increased exploitation. I could mention many other points of discussion but both the Secretariat and NGO’s such as TRAFFIC and IUCN are fully aware of the situation. Please be aware that many Rhino activists do as well and we will not let this matter be swept under the carpet again.
The media of the world has been alerted to this problem.
I HEREBY REQUEST THAT YOU, OR ANOTHER PARTY BE APPROACHED TO PUT FORWARD MY PROPOSALS A & B AS ABOVE . THIS IS NOT A CHANGE OF STATUS PER SE, RATHER THE REVISING OF A BAD DECISION THAT HAS PROVEN TO BE A FAILURE IN IT’S IMPLEMENTATION. IT IS ALSO IMPORTANT THAT A PROPOSAL BE MADE TO DESTROY ALL EXISTING HORN PILES BY BURNING SO THAT A CLEAR MESSAGE CAN BE SENT TO THE CRIMINAL ELEMENT:
“RHINO HORN IS OFF THE MENU FOREVER!”
Margot Stewart
RHINO S.O.S. South Africa
http://www.facebook.com/groups/rhinosos ;

Wednesday, 30 May 2012

Stop Rhino Hunting

Shocking footage from Witkop Safaris, hunting a critically endangered black rhino. Shame on you.

Monday, 28 May 2012

Theres a Rhino in My House

There's a Rhino in my house - part 1

There's a Rhino in my house - part 2


There's a Rhino in my house - part 3


There's a Rhino in my house - part 4

When you have a bit of time then watch this. It is about Imire Safari Ranch and all they do to save the black rhino in Zimbabwe. Even after a horrific poaching attack where Tatenda's mother was killed. See how they raised Tatenda (young male black rhino) and reintroduced him back into the semi wild.






Thursday, 24 May 2012

Tuesday, 22 May 2012

Run Run Rhino!

Just had to share this... :-)


Please help find a home for Pitbull x female

Can anyone help out to find this beautiful Pitbull X girl a new home? - She has until Friday, 25th May or otherwise she might be put to sleep.
She was found in the Cape Town, Noordhoek area.

Please forward to all your friends and contacts to help with either a foster or permanent home for this beautiful dog.

Please contact Laura if you can help : 078 815 2030

Pitbull X female

Thursday, 17 May 2012

Infographic: Understanding the rhino wars

via http://www.mnn.com/earth-matters/animals/stories/infographic-understanding-the-rhino-wars

Wednesday, 16 May 2012

Free anti-poaching course to rangers!




Please help spread the word about the next Saving Private Rhino anti-poaching course. Free to rangers. 
Visit http://savingprivaterhino.org/anti-poaching-course for the sign up form.


Monday, 14 May 2012

Kenya Relocating Rhinos In Fear Of Poachers


May 11 2012 at 11:10am 
By Stephanie Aglietti

Claus Mortensen is a private Kenyan rancher with a passion - endangered rhinos - and now a mission: to save his herd from slaughter by ruthless poachers who sell their horns to Asia, where they are prized as a miracle drug.
Nairobi - Claus Mortensen is a private Kenyan rancher with a passion - endangered rhinos - and now a mission: to save his herd from slaughter by ruthless poachers who sell their horns to Asia, where they are prized as a miracle drug.
But costs are spiralling for Mortensen and other ranchers as they battle to keep one step ahead of the hunters and guarantee the survival of rhinos, and elephants, on their expansive, remote reserves.
“Seeing a dead rhino is terrible,” said Mortensen, who runs Mugie ranch, around 300 kilometres north of the Kenyan capital Nairobi.
“Mugie is located in such a remote corner that to secure it we need many more helicopters and airplanes,” he said.
Twenty rhinos were reintroduced to the 18 000-hectare sanctuary in 2004. Four years later, poachers struck, killing one animal and hacking off its horns.
“It happened again and again,” said Mortensen, explaining that his and other ranchers' work has changed from basic conservation to intelligence gathering operations aimed at deterring poachers.
And the change has pushed up bills: private ranchers have had to triple the number of rangers working their reserves and it now costs an average $1 200 (900 euros) a month, up from $150, to keep one rhino alive.
“All night, all day... you have your telephone on, radio on, next to your bed and when somebody calls your heart stops beating,” Mortensen said.
Kenya, which has the world's third largest rhino population - around 600 black and 300 white rhinos, is constantly battling poachers. In 2009, it suffered its worst year for rhino poaching when 12 black and six white rhinos were killed.
The illegal trade is driven by the voracious Asian and Middle Eastern demand for the animals' horns for use in traditional medicines for fevers, convulsions and as an aphrodisiac.
The horns mainly contain keratin - a substance also found in animal hooves, human nails and hair - and despite having no medicinal value, demand continues to rise.
“The increase, escalation of poaching is driven by the growing influence of the Asian economy. There is a legal market for illegal horns,” said Patrick Bergin, the director of the Washington-based African Wildlife Foundation (AWF).
“It is a complex phenomenon. Poachers are from international gangs and have sophisticated arms - and they are ready to do anything,” said Patrick Omondi of the state-run Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS).
A kilo of rhino horn can cost as much as $60 000 (45 000 euros), according to KWS estimates.
The KWS has transferred 11 of Mugie's rhinos to a park near the shores of Lake Victoria, and will relocate the rest to another more secure private ranch.
Poachers have also hit Kenya's renowned rhino sanctuaries in Laikipia, on the equator in the foothills of snowcapped Mount Kenya.
According to the British-based conservation charity Save the Rhino, the area has the largest population of rhinos in East and Central Africa, with 49 percent of Kenya's black rhino population and 70 percent of its white rhinos, but resources at the area's sanctuaries have been stretched fending off the marauding gangs.
“Private sanctuaries do not have enough money. They cannot afford to protect the rhinos,” said Mordecai Ogadam of the Laikipia Wildlife Forum.
Between 2007 and 2011, Kenya lost 75 rhinos and so far this year, 12 have been killed, according to Kenya wildlife officials.
Authorities have arrested several suspected poachers and confiscated weapons and traps, but their efforts do not seem to deter the gunmen.
Despite a ban on rhino horn trade by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species, which took effect in 1975 and now has 175 members including Kenya, the world rhino population has almost been wiped out, with 90 percent lost since the 1970s, according to the AWF. - Sapa-AFP

via www.uniteagainstpoaching.co.za

Oryx (Gemsbok)





Saturday, 12 May 2012

Please share the truth about rhino horn



Please share the truth about rhino horn and help stop the illegal slaughter of rhinos.
via http://www.nosyrosy.co.za/to_do_&_see/rhino_horn_is_not_medicine_facts

Wednesday, 9 May 2012

Alternatives to rhino horn

Here's another good reason why the trade in rhino horn should never be allowed. Just look at what happened to the Saiga Antlope after conservation groups encouraged the use of it's horns as an alternative to rhino horn -  Since 2002 Saiga Antelope is on the IUCN Red List of critically endangered species after numbers fell from over 1 million to less than 30 000.



Rhinoceros horns, unlike those of other horned mammals, consist principally of keratin, the same type of protein that makes up hair and fingernails, with dense mineral deposits at the centre [1]. Pharmacological testing at Hoffmann La Roche for IUCN and WWF in1983 published in The Environmentalist concluded that “rhino horn, like fingernails, is made of agglutinated hair and has no analgesic, anti-inflammatory, anti-spasmolytic nor diuretic properties. No bactericidal effect could be found against suppuration and intestinal bacteria. Essentially, ingesting rhino horn is the same as chewing your own fingernails.” [2]

More recently, in 2008 Dr. Raj Amin at the Zoological Society of London also put rhino horn through rigorous scientific testing, confirming the conclusions drawn by earlier research, namely that rhino horn contains no medicinal properties. [3]

According to researchers at the Department of Biology and Chinese Medicinal Material Research Centre of the Chinese University of Hong Kong, the mechanism of action of rhinoceros horn, however, is considered to be complicated. “Apparently, based on the results of this study, rhinoceros horn can reduce fever (on rats), but only at rather high dosage levels when prescribed as a single drug.” [4] In this study, rats induced with fever showed temporary lowering of temperature after being injected with an exceptionally high concentration of rhino horn extract. However, there was no antipyretic effect at the dosage levels comparable to what would actually be prescribed to a human patient, confirming that rhino horn would essentially be ineffective in reducing fever.

During the 1990s, Paul But, PhD, then at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, performed experiments to test the effectiveness of rhino horn and its alternatives. His study found that rhino horn and high doses of water buffalo horn could reduce fever and counter toxins - as, however, could a combination of herbs without any type of horn. In a 1993 paper, the Chinese Association of Medicine and Philosophy recommended Sheng Di Huang (Rehmanniae Radix) and Huang Lian (Coptidis Rhizoma) as acceptable botanical substitutes for rhino horn, based on Dr. But’s study. [5]

A 2002 survey of herbal practitioners featured in the book Mending the Web of Life noted potential botanical replacements for rhino horn, including Sheng Di Huang (Rehmanniae Radix) and Gou Teng (Uncariae Ramulus cum Uncis) as a potential alternative for “clearing heat and arresting tremors” (actions assigned to rhino horn). [6]

In a 2006 report commissioned by DEFRA (UK Department for Environment, Food and Rural affairs) and IFAW (International Fund for Animal Welfare), both rhino horn and substitute plants were investigated. Rhino horn did not demonstrate anti-bacterial or anti-inflammatory properties, whereas most of the herbs selected demonstrated some anti-bacterial activity and/or potential anti-inflammatory properties. [7] The report identified nine potential botanical alternatives to rhino horn, based on tests conducted and evidence from published TCM and other scientific literature: Ban Lan Gen (Radix Isatidis), Chi Shao (Paeoniae Radix rubra), Mu Dan Pi (Cortex Moutan), Dan Shen (Radix Salvia Miltiorrhozae), Jin Yin Hua (Flos Lonicerae), Lian Qiao (Fructus Forsythia), Sheng Di Huang (Rehmanniae Radix), Xuan Shen (Scrophulariae Radix) and Zi Cao (Radix Arnebiae).

Due to concerns about the decimation of rhino populations throughout the 1980s and 1990s, TCM practitioners have been encouraged to substitute other ingredients in place of rhino horn, and in the 1990s, conservation groups encouraged the use of saiga antelope (Saiga tatarica, Bovidae). While this plan was well-intentioned, it had disastrous results, as by 2003 fewer than 30,000 individuals remained in Russia and Kazakhstan, which had previously had a population of over 1 million, largely due to rampant poaching for use in TCM. After this dramatic population crash, in 2002 saiga antelope was added to the IUCN Red List of critically endangered species, and TCM practitioners are now actively discouraged from using its horn (see Saiga Antelope, JCM Page link). Instead, the horns of water buffalo and cows are now commonly promoted as alternatives to rhino horn.

In addition to herbal alternatives, according to Dr Ho Ka Cheong, President of the Herbalist Association in Hong Kong, rhino horn can be simply, cheaply and effectively replaced by Aspirin. [8]

via The Journal of Traditional Chinese Medicine
http://www.jcm.co.uk/endangered-species-campaign/rhinoceros/alternatives-to-rhino-horn/

 

Tuesday, 8 May 2012

Mountain Zebras

Looking at the camera!

Baby running!

Another baby standing in the cold

Monday, 7 May 2012

The last elephant?

This video is about elephant poaching and ivory trade which is closely related to rhino poaching. This is proof why the trade in rhino horn (or any animal parts) should never be allowed. It is quite long but gives a good overview.

Saturday, 5 May 2012

Another horrific rhino poaching incident

Rhino female and calf shot and one female wounded.
Poached rhino

Both horns removed

Entry wound on the calf
via www.facebook.com/pages/An-Ugly-Truth



Only 7 Northern White rhinos left in the world

The Northern white rhino (Ceratothorium simum cottoni) is one of  two sub species of the White rhino (found in Africa).  The other, and better known subspecies is the Southern white rhino.  If you have ever been lucky enough to see a White rhino it is almost certain that you have seen a Southern white rhino. There are only 7 Northern white rhinos left in the world today, and only 4 of them are fertile.  


This makes them officially the most endangered mammal in the world.  Originally found in ranges as broad as Uganda, Chad, Sudan, Central African Republic and the Democratic Republic of Congo, sadly the last sighting of a Northern white rhino in the wild was in 2007.

However, there is hope!  In 2009 the last 4 fertile Northern whites were relocated from Dvur Kralove Zoo in the Czech Republic to a specially designed boma on Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Kenya.  As recently as April this year Suni and Najin were observed mating, so everyone has their fingers crossed that these 4 rhinos can help save the Northern white rhino from extinction.

We were lucky enough to visit the Northern white rhinos on Ol Pejeta in 2011 and will very soon be launching a page on our website dedicate to telling their story and tracking their progress. Stay tuned for more details...

Ol Pejeta is one of our beneficiary projects and, along with Save the Rhino, benefits from all of our fundraising activities.  To make a donation to Helping Rhinos, please click here
Northern White Rhinos mating



via www.helpingrhinos.org



Thursday, 3 May 2012

Wednesday, 2 May 2012

How you can help stop rhino poaching




via Ciske Kruger on Facebook

Rhino protesters, police look on


Policeman look on as a protester carries a placard calling for an end to rhino poaching, which threatens the survival of rhino species, outside the Chinese embassy in Pretoria. South Africa loses hundreds of rhinos a year to illegal horn trade as high demand for rhino horn in the illegal market triggers an unprecedented poaching crisis.

via http://empatheticvegan.tumblr.com/post/22245367475/politics-war-policeman-look-on-as-a-protester